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Discover the Fountain Of Youth with Anti Aging Drugs

By Tom Seest

Can Anti Aging Drugs Really Turn Back Time?

At GettingOlderNews, we help people who want to learn more about aging and anti-aging.

Imagine taking a pill that extends your lifespan, slows age-related decline, and prevents disease. Scientists are working hard to find such medications; one promising candidate is Rapamycin – an mTOR inhibitor that enhances anticancer immunity while also increasing lifespan in laboratory animals.
If the TAME trial successfully proves that aging can be combatted, this would shift medical practices away from treating diseases after they appear and towards preventative medicine.

Can Anti Aging Drugs Really Turn Back Time?

Can Anti Aging Drugs Really Turn Back Time?

Can Metformin Really Slow Down the Aging Process?

Metformin is often prescribed by physicians for those diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes and is also widely used to treat other conditions, including prediabetes and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Metformin works by lowering blood glucose levels and altering the body’s response to insulin, helping patients lose weight, manage blood sugar, lower cholesterol levels, and even slowing aging effects – however, large clinical trials must first be completed to verify this finding.
Metformin belongs to a class of medications known as biguanides and comes as either a liquid, tablet, or extended-release (long-acting) tablet. Depending on its dosage and doctor’s instructions, Metformin should typically be taken one or two times each day with meals; depending on dosage, it may also be combined with other diabetes drugs like sulfonylureas or glyburide. In certain instances, it can even help protect against heart attacks.
Most side effects of metformin are mild and should subside over time, including stomach ache, gas, bloating, and diarrhea – particularly common when starting treatment for the first time. Some individuals also report experiencing an unpleasant metallic taste in their mouth or extreme tiredness or dizziness. People with kidney or liver diseases may be at greater risk for experiencing serious adverse reactions, including lactic acidosis, which occurs when too much lactic acid builds up in your bloodstream and must be addressed quickly, or it could prove fatal; be sure to inform your physician if this applies before taking this medicine!
If you take metformin, it is wise to avoid drinking alcohol or eating large amounts in a short period (binge drinking), as this increases your risk for lactic acidosis. Furthermore, special care should be taken if undergoing radiological studies with intravenous contrast. Metformin may increase your risk for serious side effects, like lactic academia, if surgery occurs since anesthesia may interact with this medication; be sure to ask your physician beforehand about it.

Can Metformin Really Slow Down the Aging Process?

Can Metformin Really Slow Down the Aging Process?

Can Growth Hormone Really Turn Back the Clock?

GH (growth hormone) is a naturally occurring hormone that assists the body’s metabolic processes by turning food into energy or tissue. While its primary purpose in childhood was promoting growth, adulthood saw this same hormone promote protein synthesis and fat breakdown to increase muscle mass, improve ratios between good to bad cholesterol ratios, promote bone and cartilage development as well as regulate blood sugar and insulin levels, and enhance aerobic capacity. Furthermore, it boosts IGF-1 production, which has effects similar to yet stronger than those of its parent hormone, GH.
One study provided participants with either synthetic human growth hormone (GH) or a placebo for six months. Participants exposed to GH gained on average 4.6 pounds of lean body mass while losing equal amounts of fat, without significant changes to LDL (bad) cholesterol or triglycerides levels and had overall better lipid profiles than control subjects; however, the treatment caused side effects like fluid retention, joint pain and breast enlargement.
Another large clinical trial examined women with isolated growth hormone deficiency who received either growth hormone therapy or placebo treatment and found those receiving growth hormone experienced significantly greater height gains compared to their counterparts receiving placebo treatment. Additionally, treatment with growth hormone also improved somatometric parameters and helped bring forward puberty by one or two years – but had no detrimental effects on menstruation cycles or fertility of these women.
Although GH is an endo-, auto-, and paracrine hormone with multiple beneficial effects, its misuse can have detrimental results, such as in acromegaly, where excessive secretion causes high blood pressure and diabetes. Secretions of GH vary pulsatility, with growth hormone-releasing hormone increasing it while inhibiting it with somatostatin; the hormone can then be proteolytically broken down into tissue specifically by proteases to produce shorter forms with unknown activities.

Can Growth Hormone Really Turn Back the Clock?

Can Growth Hormone Really Turn Back the Clock?

Can Rapamycin Really Slow Down Aging?

Rapamycin, an FDA-approved medication used to prevent organ rejection after transplants and coat coronary stents, was demonstrated to extend the lifespan of mice in 2009. Researchers believe it could also delay many age-related diseases, such as heart disease, arthritis, cancer, and Alzheimer’s. It works by inhibiting mTOR, an enzyme involved in cell growth and metabolism that has been proven to increase lifespan among worms, mice, and dogs; furthermore, it may reduce inflammation and cancer among humans.
Recent research on mTOR inhibitors suggests that human longevity may be increased through administering them for short periods during middle age, according to a recent Nature study in which mice treated with rapamycin lived 50% longer than mice who received placebo treatment; they also had fewer symptoms associated with aging such as muscle weakness and poor motor coordination, as well as improved lung function due to this treatment.
Rapamycin and Everolimus pose some potential side effects; their suppression of white blood cells could increase infection risks and possibly result in lung function loss. Researchers are exploring ways to lessen these side effects for anti-ageing purposes – they are testing low doses with intermittent dosing as well as compounds targeting mTORC1 to isolate its benefits from side effects.
Though the results of this study are promising, more research needs to be conducted before using rapamycin as an anti-aging medicine in humans. Although FDA-approved rapamycin does not meet longevity goals, longevity enthusiasts are conducting tests using low doses.
Note that rapamycin is an immune suppressant drug and should only be taken under medical advice and with regular monitoring of blood levels. There may also be concerns that taking low doses on an intermittent basis could increase cancer risks; however, any risk can be reduced by taking small doses on a regular basis.

Can Rapamycin Really Slow Down Aging?

Can Rapamycin Really Slow Down Aging?

Is There a Safer Option?

Toxicity is the degree to which substances damage living organisms. It may affect entire systems like the central nervous system (CNS), organs such as the liver, or individual systems such as the respiratory system. Drugs that produce serious and sometimes deadly side effects are considered toxic; that’s why the FDA mandates extensive tests before their market release. Toxicologists work at the forefront of science in search of ways to enhance drug development or better comprehend existing medications’ side effects.
Toxicity can be measured using the dose-response relationship, which shows how a compound affects an individual. Many factors can impact this response to medication, including its route of administration (applied topically or inhaled, consumed or injected), duration of exposure time, physical form (solid, liquid, or gas), genetic makeup, or overall health status of individuals taking it.
At higher doses, all substances can be toxic; the exact level of damage depends on each person and may depend on genetic makeup and overall health status. Some toxins are potent enough to kill an organism instantly while others creep slowly into our systems wreaking havoc over time – the study of toxicology seeks to understand these differences and prevent their negative consequences.
Many potential treatments prove toxic in early clinical trials, leading to their cancellation or attrition from drug development efforts. Failure to identify toxicity issues through animal models has been estimated as being responsible for losing at least one out of three drugs from development processes altogether; estimated attrition costs run into millions, and years of research may have been lost as a result.
Drug development toxicity occurs through off-target toxicity, metabolic toxicity, and idiosyncratic reactions – unusually severe adverse events difficult to predict or explain using animal models; metabolic toxicity occurs when drugs are converted to reactive metabolites that interact with proteins to alter their function, while idiosyncratic reactions occur only rarely among a small proportion of patients and may be hard to detect in large clinical trials.

Is There a Safer Option?

Is There a Safer Option?

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