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Discover the Power Of Youthful Skin with Anti Aging Antioxidants

By Tom Seest

How Can Anti Aging Antioxidants Transform Your Skin?

At GettingOlderNews, we help people who want to learn more about aging and anti-aging.

Studies have demonstrated that decreasing our body’s production of free radicals can lengthen life expectancy, thus leading many scientific journals to study antioxidants’ impact on aging and other forms of oxidative stress-related conditions.
Antioxidants act like tiny heroes battling free-radical damage and premature aging in our cells, protecting against further free-radical damage to protect you from cell damage and prolong cellular lifespan. Studies have confirmed this effect and proven that those taking antioxidant supplements tend to live healthier lives than those who don’t take antioxidants regularly.

How Can Anti Aging Antioxidants Transform Your Skin?

How Can Anti Aging Antioxidants Transform Your Skin?

What Makes Vitamin C the Ultimate Anti-Aging Antioxidant?

Vitamin C (also known as L-ascorbic acid) is an essential anti-aging nutrient with numerous anti-oxidative benefits. As a water-soluble antioxidant, it plays an essential role in building blood vessels, cartilage and muscle tissue while aiding absorption and storage of iron in our bodies. Furthermore, vitamin C acts as an antioxidant, protecting body cells against damage caused by free radicals (atoms with one electron missing), one cause of oxidative stress leading to premature skin aging and disease.
Research suggests that topical application of vitamin C reduces oxidative stress and enhances skin texture, tone and smoothness. Furthermore, topical vitamin C acts as an effective anti-aging ingredient, helping reduce fine lines and wrinkles as well as increasing collagen production – essential to firm and tighten skin tissue tightening and firming processes. Furthermore, topical vitamin C application may also help decrease sun damage and dark spots as well as brighten overall complexion brightness.
Vitamin C topical applications can be safely applied daily and are appropriate for most skin types. It should be noted, however, that vitamin C may increase sun sensitivity and cause a tingling sensation upon application to the skin. If irritation arises after continuing use of this ingredient it would be wise to switch over to one without vitamin C or lower concentrations of this component in its formula.
High-dose dietary vitamin C supplements may cause nausea, diarrhea, and stomach cramps in some people. Vitamin C also interacts with certain medications used for chemotherapy or hormone replacement therapies; those suffering from hemochromatosis – an iron overload condition in their bodies — should avoid taking high-dose vitamin C supplements as this could worsen their condition.
Studies suggest that intravenous vitamin C could be effective at treating SARS-CoV2 infection and its related illness, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Other studies, however, have not demonstrated significant benefits in this regard and further investigation is required to assess its effectiveness and safety.

What Makes Vitamin C the Ultimate Anti-Aging Antioxidant?

What Makes Vitamin C the Ultimate Anti-Aging Antioxidant?

What Makes Vitamin E the Ultimate Anti-Aging Antioxidant?

Vitamin E is the go-to vitamin when it comes to protecting skin cells from damage caused by free radicals that lead to wrinkles and discoloration, acting as an excellent anti-inflammatory to decrease redness, acne and rosacea symptoms. You’ll find vitamin E naturally present in many food sources like seeds, nuts and leafy green vegetables as well as in supplements; additionally it can be added into many skincare products such as creams and serums for maximum benefit.
Vitamin E works in tandem with vitamin C for maximum effectiveness; when selecting anti-aging products, look for these two ingredients together for maximum benefits.
Studies have demonstrated that vitamin E may help prevent or delay age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cataracts from emerging, while also supporting long-term eye health by helping maintain healthy blood vessels and avoiding oxidative stress formation in the eyes.
Vitamin E can be obtained through either a balanced diet or supplements containing tocopherols and tocotrienols from natural sources. Nuts, seeds, whole grains and vegetable oils contain Vitamin E; as do fortified foods that include it.
There are eight vitamin E compounds known as tocotrienols and tocopherols, commonly referred to as Vitamin E, with four homologs of each Tocopherol (a-tocopherol, b-tocopherol, g-tocopherol, and d-tocopherol), four homologs of alpha-tocotrienol (alpha-tocotrienol), alpha-beta tocotrienols (gamma, alpha-beta, and delta beta tocotrienol). All eight compounds possess various antioxidant activities depending on their structure while all possess significant biological activity.
Studies have demonstrated the correlation between Vitamin E intake and reduced cardiovascular disease risk, such as decreased oxidative stress and inflammation in the body and subsequent reduction in cholesterol levels and its intake. Studies also show it to protect against free radical damage caused by smoking, UV radiation exposure, pollution or free radical production from environmental sources – this helps ensure normal neurological function as well as supporting an efficient immune system and maintaining normal immunity systems – all key elements for supporting a healthy immune system while helping lower blood pressure or reduce risk for cancer.

What Makes Vitamin E the Ultimate Anti-Aging Antioxidant?

What Makes Vitamin E the Ultimate Anti-Aging Antioxidant?

Want to Turn back the Clock? Try Selenium!

Selenium, an essential trace mineral, plays an essential role in many body processes including metabolism and thyroid health. Furthermore, selenium acts as an antioxidant, helping reduce oxidative stress levels and enhance immunity system functionality. Seafood, organ meats, Brazil nuts and dairy products are excellent sources of selenium; plant foods also receive selenium from soil sources which affects how much is found in our diets.
Selenium may help reduce heart disease risk by lowering C-reactive protein levels, while it could also lower your risk for atherosclerosis (plaque build-up in your arteries) (35). Selenium has also been found to protect against insulin resistance which often leads to diabetes; according to research published in “The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition”, those consuming more selenium had lower risks of high blood sugar and greater ability to control their glucose.
Selenium is essential to normal immune system function and helps protect against viral infections like influenza and Coxsackievirus, which cause hand, foot and mouth disease. Selenium deficiency may also weaken muscles; for example in Keshan disease caused by selenium deficiency combined with Coxsackievirus infection (36)
Studies suggest that low levels of selenium in the body can contribute to cognitive decline and memory issues. Some studies even indicate it might slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease; more research needs to be conducted (37).
Lower selenium levels have also been shown to contribute to Hashimoto’s disease, an autoimmune thyroid condition. A recent study demonstrated that people with lower serum selenium levels displayed more severe symptoms than those with higher levels (41).
As too much selenium can be harmful, it is recommended that your daily selenium consumption be limited to 55 micrograms. Furthermore, it’s wiser to source it through food sources rather than supplements since supplements often contain too much of this mineral.

Want to Turn back the Clock? Try Selenium!

Want to Turn back the Clock? Try Selenium!

How Do Carotenoids Keep You Looking Younger?

Carotenoids are tetraterpene pigments found throughout photosynthesizing bacteria, archaea fungi, algae, plants, and animals. Alongside chlorophylls they form essential compounds in photosynthesis acting as color attractants, photo-protectors, antioxidants and precursors of several plant hormones; commonly referred to as vitamin A ligands. While chlorophylls absorb light energy at specific wavelengths most carotenoids absorb multiple wavelengths providing them with their variety of colors.
Carotenoids are fat-soluble substances and circulate through the blood as lipoproteins, meaning that they can help protect cholesterol from being oxidized and reduce atherosclerosis. Furthermore, epidemiological studies have linked higher dietary intakes of carotenoids with reduced measures of carotid intima-media thickness – an indicator of cardiovascular disease risk.
Mammals can be divided into three groups according to their ability to absorb different types of carotenoids: white-fat animals like pigs, sheep, goats and cats have very limited carotenes absorption whereas yellow-fat animals (including ruminant cattle and horses ) absorb only carotenes while humans and other mammals absorb both carotenes and xanthophylls.
Epidemiological studies on carotenoids often yield contradictory findings due to in vitro assays not accurately reflecting physiological mechanisms operating at the cell level or possible interference from ROS production by endogenous sources (Radical Oxidant Stress). Furthermore, high doses used in in vivo experiments may not be relevant or feasible in the human diet.
Diet is one way of providing yourself with enough antioxidants. Fruits and vegetables, particularly leafy greens, contain ample amounts of these powerful anti-oxidant foods which will scavenge free radicals responsible for oxidative damage to keep you looking younger; but you cannot depend solely on antioxidants to manage ROS production; instead you must adopt an anti-inflammatory lifestyle which helps control unnecessary oxidants while minimizing their negative impacts on the body – this is where our seven heavyweight nutrient police come into play:

How Do Carotenoids Keep You Looking Younger?

How Do Carotenoids Keep You Looking Younger?

Be sure to read our other related stories at GettingOlderNews to learn more about aging and anti-aging.